©  Copyright 2016 NMGMF

Website Design by Barr Creative

One way the Foundation raises funds to preserve and maintain the Mansion is to produce ornaments    reflective of the rich culture of New Mexico.   These ornaments are of the highest quality and are beautifully designed, so they are very collectible. In fact, you can get a Collection of the Available ornaments here.  All proceeds from ornament sales benefit the New Mexico Governor’s Mansion Foundation, a non-partisan, non-profit 501(c) 3 organization operated by volunteers.

Go to the STORE.

Finishing Touches

316 N. Main St.

Roswell , NM 88201

575-622-0528

Museum Of New Mexico Foundation

1411 Paseo De Peralta,

Santa Fe, NM 87501

The Shop -

         A Christmas Store

116 E. Palace Ave.

Santa Fe, NM 87501

505 983-4823

 

There are now 4 locations around the state that display and sell our ornaments.

New Mexico State Capitol

Governor's Suite, 4th Floor

490 Old Santa Fe Trail

Santa Fe NM 87501

505-986-4589

New Mexico Films the Great American West - 2020

New Mexico has a proud history connected to the land— agriculture, livestock and the breath-taking beauty of the Land of Enchantment’s natural terrain, all play roles in the ranching and farming industries that helped to build the state into what it is today. Additionally, the state is world- renowned for its film industry, which dates back to 1898, when Thomas Alva Edison produced a short film entitled “Indian Day School” shot at Isleta Pueblo. From these humble beginnings, New Mexico has achieved great success positioning itself as one of the top places to produce western-themed films, with the state’s natural beauty also used as a stand-in for many other states. Some of the well-known films with Western themes include: “The Cheyenne Social Club” (1970), “The Cowboys” (1972), “Silverado” (1985), “3:10 to Yuma” (2007), “True Grit” (2010) and “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs” (2018).

To depict these essential strands of state history, The New Mexico Governor’s Mansion Foundation partnered with the New Mexico Film Office to produce an ornament design contest that would promote the state’s history of film production and ranch culture. Along with the backing of the Office of the Governor and the Economic Development Department, the contest was fashioned using the theme “New Mexico Films the Great American West.” Of the many wonderful designs submitted, the top five were awarded educational grant funding. The winning design was created by Carrie Dada.

New Mexico's Flamenco Dancer La Emi - 2018/2019

New Mexico has played a great role in the development of the art of flamenco in its modern form. Due to New Mexico’s own fascinating history as being a confluence of many converging—if oft-times warring cultures—the state is perfectly suited to being synonymous with flamenco. New Mexico’s famous fusion of cultures and influences has taken something that began around gypsy campfires of Europe before travelling abroad and into court performances before the royals, into something that is accessible and relatable for everyone. With its roots in many types of folk dance, flamenco is now ready to command the grand stages of the world.

 

The subject of the Flamenco Dancer ornament is New Mexico native Emmy Grimm, known as “La Emi.” She was a protégé of renowned dancer María Benítez, and is now a powerhouse artiste in her own right. La Emi has danced and toured throughout the world, including training under Carmela Greco of Spain. La Emi has opened her own school, EmiArte Flamenco Academy, a professional company EmiArte Flamenco, and a youth company, Flamenco Youth de Santa Fe. The New Mexico Governor’s Mansion Foundation is proud to present this exquisite design, one that demonstrates the state’s unique connection to a proud and ancient art form.

New Mexico's Storyteller - 2018

The “Storyteller” is a clay figure that is made by the people of the pueblos to put the tradition of storytelling into an art form.  New Mexico's clay art form was started by Helen Cordero in 1964, and her daughter-in-law, Mary Trujillo has completed her final Storyteller for this ornament design.  Mary is considered to be one of the most accomplished potters at Cochiti Pueblo, and this is truly a unique ornament that is certain to become a treasured part of your collection.

State Gem of New Mexico: Turquoise - 2016/2017

The new ornament is called the State Gem of New Mexico: Turquoise!   The ornament's shape is patterned after the Naja, which is the pendant at the bottom of the squash blossom necklace.  The landscape represents the Turquoise Trail, which is a national scenic byway in New Mexico.  The Zia symbol is our state's official symbol and the ornament's depiction of the Zia will have a genuine piece of turquoise embedded in the center.

Chile of New Mexico - 2015

New Mexico is famous for its chile peppers!  This ornament highlights the importance of the chile pepper in the diet of the New Mexican.  The history of this state vegetable is outlined along with the definition of the word itself.    And of course, the famous question, “Red or Green?” is explained in detail.    In 1999, the New Mexico Legislature adopted this as it official State question honoring the importance of the chile.  The answer to the question is found in the ornament’s information card, so get one today to found out what it is!

 

The concept of the Chile of New Mexico ornament begins with the rich heritage of New Mexico culture. For more than 400 years the multi-cultural influences of Spanish and Pueblo Indians have transpired to the savory flavor of New Mexican cuisine and cultural identity.

 Additionally, chile production plays a major role in the state’s economy contributing $400 million and 4,000 jobs annually.

Whether it’s flame-roasted green chile or fiery red, the significance of chile to New Mexico is as strong as potatoes are to Idaho.

Roads of New Mexico - 2014

 

The concept of Route 66 began with the development of a Federal highway system in the 1920’s when the number of vehicles in the United States reached 1 Million. A diagonal highway was proposed to run from Chicago to Los Angeles. Originally labelled Route 60 or 62, it was officially designated as Route 66 in 1926. Over the next decade, it became the Route of choice for the “Okies”, the migrants who fled the dust bowl of the midwest and headed to California. John Steinbeck, who wrote “The Grapes of Wrath” called it the “road of flight.”

Skies of New Mexico - 2013

 

Each year in October, the premier international ballooning event takes place in Albuquerque.  The event is powered by the perfect climate and a phenomenon called the Albuquerque Box (a combination of weather patterns and geographic landscape, the box allows balloonists to control and even retrace their adventure).  There are various other balloon rallies held throughout the state such as Mesilla Valley, Taos, White Sands and Roswell.  The Balloon Fiesta held in Albuquerque has made the city the undisputed Balloon Capitol of the World!

Now available online!

New Mexico Centennial - 2011/2012

At 1:35 pm on January 6, 1912, President William H Taft signed a long awaited proclamation that admitted New Mexico into the United States as the 47th state.  That day ended more than half a century of work, effort, and hope by the residents of the New Mexico Territory.

 

2012 is the Centennial Year, when all New Mexicans can celebrate their history and take pride in their efforts.  This ornament depicts the Zia symbol which is depicted alone on the state flag.  It also contains descriptions and information pertaining to the Kokopelli, New Mexico pottery, the chile pepper, and the settlers that came to New Mexico.

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New Mexico State Capitol Building - 2010

 

The New Mexico State Capitol, known as the Roundhouse, is the only round capitol building in the country. It was built by Robert E. McKee with a design by W.C. Kruger that combined elements of New Mexico Territorial style, Pueblo adobe architecture and Greek Revival adaptations. The 232,000 square-foot Roundhouse was dedicated on Dec. 8, 1966. 

From a bird's-eye view, the Roundhouse resembles the Zia sun symbol, which is also emblazoned on the New Mexico state flag. The image, which originated at Zia Pueblo, incorporates elements representing the sun's rays, the four directions, the four seasons, and the four phases of life. The State Seal of New Mexico, carved in stone, hangs above each of the Roundhouse's four entrance wings.

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